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The bike club encourages students to cheat

“Get your scores and go.” A group of children line up on a dusty red path for a race in Yarralin, a city of 300 souls in the middle of an Australian suburb. It is about the village, the path is 1400 meters long. Parents and other villagers cheer from the sidelines, with the local policeman stopping the time. The tennis dean also cheers the kids on loudly – a 69-year-old children’s teacher. He started the Bike Club, which now runs regular races.

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In fact, Dean was already retired and wanted to live a quiet life in the small town of Katherine in the northern part of Australia. But then he got a call: the school in Yarrell, about 400 kilometers from his hometown, was looking for a replacement teacher.

School students are interested in cycling

Dean went with his wife without being able to say “no”. After discovering his love of cycling two years ago and regaining health after previous hip surgery, the former athlete brought some bikes to his new students. The experienced teacher knows little about the excitement he raises. He had to arrange more bikes soon – this was not a big problem as he donated generously.

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Meanwhile, a dedicated teacher and his students ride cattle “plow” paths through the Australian bush. Teen takes the kids on outings to classes, but often goes out with them after school. For example, children enjoy driving to Philbank, to a small outdoor water body, to search for local artifacts, to collect crocodile eggs, and then they eat together.

Monthly bike race

Apart from this, the author, who also started a community garden and recycling program, organizes monthly bike races around Yarrell. “The shops have medals and vouchers to win,” the 69-year-old said. The teacher said everyone was so excited. “Not everyone can wait to ride a bike,” ten-year-old Olivia Rankin told the Australian Broadcasting ABC, who was to report on the bike club and the completely reformed city it brought with it.

The newly stimulated enthusiasm helped to contain the barrier in the isolated region. Wesley Campbell, a distant school attendance strategist who has always struggled with the difficult task of getting up early to “attract” children to school.

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86 percent have played trout before

Education figures show that some distance schools, such as those in Yarrell, had an attendance rate of just 14 percent in 2019. “Before it was a bit difficult, some kids didn’t want to come to school,” Campbell told ABC. Kids will want to keep busy at home with video games, YouTube and Dictoc. But since the tennis teen arranged the bikes, the kids are at school in front of him from Monday to Friday. Bikes are a big help to him in achieving his goal – i.e. 80 per cent attendance.

Since ABC reported on the interest in Yarrell, the tennis teen and the children’s bicycle, the desire to help from other parts of the country has increased again. “Since then, we’ve got more support and more offers for new bikes,” Dean said. Soon he will be charging over 100 bikes. Helmets and T-shirts were also provided. In the meantime, it is planned to set up a BMX lane next to the school, sometimes to welcome tourists and take them on tours.

Who will continue the plans when the teen leaves?

Now Dean’s biggest concern is whether all the exciting projects among the children will continue even after he leaves Yarl. Now he wants to set up a committee for this. “Maybe I hope I can inspire other seniors as well,” he said. Because of his training, he has not regained his “old weight” and now he is more fit, he even hit his 30-year-old friend while cycling.

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